Palaeoanatomy in Munich

The SPM researches human-animal-environment relationships in prehistoric and early historic times. The questions are both archaeological and biological, focusing on the domestication and cultural history of domestic animals, the transition from an appropriative way of life to agriculture and animal husbandry, the Romanization of Raetia, and the migration of humans and animals across the Alps.

Research

The range of methods includes morphological and osteometric examinations as well as analyses of light stable isotopes and ancient DNA. In addition, the Bavarian State Collection for Palaeoanatomy is significantly involved in the standardized recording of archaeozoological primary data in the OssoBook database. For the determination of animal remains, the SPM has a comprehensive comparative collection of recent vertebrate skeletons, which is currently being digitized.

Aşıklı Höyük

The Early Neolithic site of Aşıklı Höyük is the largest and best-studied settlement in Central Anatolia and was permanently inhabited from c. 8350 BC to c. 7300 BC. Aşıklı Höyük provides valuable insights into architecture, culture, human and animal nutrition, vegetation, and the development of agriculture and animal husbandry in the Neolithic period. While hunting was still important for the meat supply of the inhabitants at the beginning of the settlement, livestock farming gained importance later on, with sheep being the most important livestock species.

Bavarian State Collection for Palaeoanatomy

The Bavarian State Collection for Palaeoanatomy is an institution of the Bavarian Natural History Collections (SNSB). The scientists there research the human-animal-environment relationships in prehistoric and early historic times. The questions are oriented both archaeologically-culturally-historically and biologically-animal-medically, they focus on the domestication and cultural history of domestic animals, the transition from an appropriating way of life to agriculture and animal husbandry, the Romanization of Raetia as well as the migration of humans and animals across the Alps.

Research Insights

Romans brought mules with them

Research in the spotlight

Erst die Römer brachten auch Maultiere im ersten Jahrhundert über die Alpen nach Norden, davor wurden in Mitteleuropa ausschließlich Pferde als Reittiere genutzt.

learn more

Major new international research reveals new evidence about when, where, and how chickens were domesticated

Research in the spotlight

Neue Forschungsergebnisse verändern unser Verständnis der Umstände und des Zeitpunkts der Domestikation von Hühnern, ihrer Ausbreitung über Asien in den Westen und zeigen, wie sich ihre Rolle in den Gesellschaften während der letzten 3.500 Jahre verändert hat.

learn more

The Great Ditch and the Many Shafts. Archaeozoology of Medieval Munich

Research in the spotlight

The excavations on the “Marienhof” in Munich behind the city hall represent the largest archaeological procedure in the old town of Munich to date.

learn more